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Kitchen Literacy 2

PART 2—Continuing our conversation with Ann Vileisis, author of Kitchen Literacy, she explains how over time we became gradually disconnected from how foods were produced, and where they originated. Most importantly, the advertising industry played a significant role in changing American values toward food, and easing the transformation to the industrial food production system of today. No easy feat to accomplish, it took many years to fully inculcate society to the new norms of food consumption.

Kitchen Literacy-Part 1: A conversation with author, Ann Vileisis about her new book Kitchen Literacy; what we know about our food, and how we came to know it. For Ann, Kitchen Literacy came about because she was struck by how much she didn’t know about the common foods she encountered in the supermarket.

Related: Food Is Love: Advertising and Gender Roles In Modern America[sniplet postmetadata]

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6 Comments

  1. Corporate Accountability International is launching its new food campaign, “Value the Meal”, which will be targeting those who are currently determining the “norms of food consumption”, from Monsanto to fast food giants.

    To view our blog, click here:

    valuethemeal.blogspot.com

    Thanks!

    James Reddic

  2. Cornelia says:

    These are fantastic videos – great job! This is empowering and important education for eaters. I will embed on HOMEGROWN.org as well and spread the word about Cooking Up A Story. Thank you for the work that you’re doing.

  3. rebecca says:

    I learned so much from Ann. It all makes sense to me now, how our food evolved to where it is today. Like she says, it’s time to get back to knowing where our food comes from. Wisdom in those words.

  4. Moni says:

    Rebecca, really enjoying this series!

  5. Eltear says:

    lol of course, home canning used to be big a long time ago. So technology may have been invented in 1880s, but still took a while to sell consumers on the commercial canning idea.

  6. Michael Tyas says:

    Canning was invented in the mid 1800s. I never knew that the norm was to feel uneasy about them for nearly 100 years.